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Mole at Casa Navarro Tonight!

November 18, 2014

Join Casa Navarro and UTSA Libraries Special Collections to explore the history of mole TONIGHT at 6pm!

Mole Navarro

Mole Navarro

November 10, 2014

Join Casa Navarro and UTSA Libraries Special Collections to explore the history of mole at 6pm on Tuesday, November 18th!

Mole Navarro

All Souls’ Day Bread. 1969.

November 3, 2014
tags:
Mexico: Her Daily & Festive Breads (1969) by Barbara Howland Taylor. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Mexico: Her Daily & Festive Breads (1969) by Barbara Howland Taylor. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Taylor, Barbara Howland. Mexico: Her Daily & Festive Breads. Claremont, CA: Creative Press, 1969. [TX716 .T36 1969].


Mexico, Her Daily & Festive Breads offers a brief popular history of Mexican baking, from the Aztecs’ celebration of corn goddesses to the arrival of wheat with the Spanish conquistadors, to the multitude of shapes and styles of bread encountered during the authors’ time in Mexico during the 1960s.

The book itself does not include recipes. However, laid into the opening pages of UTSA’s copy are three typed pages entitled “Bread Recipes for Mexico: Her Daily and Festive Breads by Barbara Taylor,” providing recipes for Sweet Rolls, Salt Rolls, All Souls’ Day Bread, and Three Kings’ Bread.

All Souls’ Day (or Day of the Dead) was celebrated yesterday on November 2nd, but perhaps you might still wish to  honor your departed loved ones with this recipe:


All Souls’ Day Bread

  • 1 pkg. active dry yeast
  • 1/3 cup warm water
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 3 cups white flour
  • 1 tbsp. water
  • 1 tsp. anis seed, crushed
  • 1/2 tsp. finely shredded orange peel
  • 2 eggs 
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 egg white
  • 2 tsps. water
  • Pink colored sugar or granulated sugar

Soften the yeast in 1/2 cup warm water; set aside. Cream together butter, 1/4 cup sugar, and salt until fluffy. 

Blend in 1/2 cup of flour, 1 tbsp. water, anis seed, and orange peel. Add eggs and egg yolk; beat 2 minutes. Blend in softened yeast and 1 cup of remaining flour; beat 3 minutes. Stir in remaining flour. Cover; refrigerate 4 hours or overnight.

Turn dough out onto lightly floured board. Remove one-fourth of the dough; cover and set aside. Shape remaining dough into a ball. Place on greased baking sheet and flatten to a 6-inch diameter. Divide the reserved piece of dough into quarters. Roll two quarters into two 7-inch ropes. Combine eggs white [sic] and 2 tsps. water. Place ropes in an X pattern atop loaf, attaching to loaf with egg white mixture. Form one of the remaining quarters into a 2-inch ball. Make a 2-inch wide indentation in the center of the X. Place ball of dough in the depression and attach with egg white mixture.

Divide the final quarter of dough into 4 portions. Shape each into a teardrop and secure with egg white mixture onto sides of loaf between the spokes of the X. Cover; let rise until nearly double, about 35 minutes. Bake in 325* F. for 35 to 40 minutes. Remove to wire rack. Brush with egg white mixture; sprinkle with pink sugar. Repeat brushing and sprinkling again after 5 minutes. Makes 1 loaf. 


Niño Envuelto (Jelly Roll), 1939.

October 28, 2014
tags:
Libreta de Cocina (1939) by Socorro Rubio. TX716 .M4 R82 1939. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Libreta de Cocina (1939) by Socorro Rubio. TX716 .M4 R82 1939. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Rubio, Socorro. Libreta de Cocina. 1939. TX716 .M4 R82 1939. Mexican Cookbook Collection. UTSA Libraries Special Collections. [Digital Surrogate]


During September and October, La Cocina Histórica will feature recipes from recently digitized manuscript cookbooks. 


This week’s manuscript cookbook is somewhat unusual in that it is illustrated! Socorro Rubio apparently cut images from newspapers and other sources and pasted them into her handwritten recipe book.

Sometimes, the illustrations depict a specific dish, such as the loaf of bread following Pan Inglés, while other times the association is more general, as with the Royal Baking Powder image following the Japonesas recipe (cookies prepared with strawberry jam) or the scene of a woman preparing to bake following Galletas Almendredas. A few pages also have hand-drawn sketches (perhaps by a later owner or a child?), such as the shoe designs on the verso of page 42.

Although the latter part of the cookbook includes various savory recipes for dishes such as Tacos Poblanos and Mole Verde, the bulk of its contents are for baked goods, such as the simple sponge cake jelly roll below.


Niño Envuelto (Page03)

1 00 g. de harina
100 g. de azucar 
6 huevos
1 lata de mermelada

Manera de hacerse

En una cacerola enamellada o caso de cobre se ponen 100 gramos de azucar junto con 6 yemas se bate hasta que espese es decir hasta que tenga punto de cordón enseguido la harina se cierne y se mezcla con cucharada de madera y se le agregan las 6 claras batidas a punto de turrón y se mezclan suavemente para que no se baje el batido este pasta se vacía en una charola de horno que estará perfectamente engrasada y enharinada se mete al horno en la seccion de enmedio hasta que dore se saca del horno y se vacía del horno y se vacía sobre una servilleta se unta de mermelada encima; se unta y se enrolla suavemente hasta que enfrie se parte de las orillas diagonalmente si se desea se parte a la mitad se unta de mermelada y se le pone coco encima.


Jelly Roll (Page03)

1 00 grams flour
100 grams sugar
6 eggs
1 jar of marmalade or jam

Manera de hacerse

Combine 100 grams of sugar with 6 egg yolks in an enameled or copper pot beat until thickened to the ribbon stage. Immediately sift the flour in and mix with a wooden spoon. Fold in 6 egg whites (beaten separately to soft peaks) so that the mixture doesn’t collapse. Bake in a greased and floured pan in the middle of the oven until golden. When you remove the cake from the oven, turn it out of the pan onto a cloth napkin. Spread with jam or marmalade and gently roll it up.[1]  When cool, cut into diagonal slices. If desired, reduce the amount of jam or marmalade by half and put coconut on top. 


[1] The lack of punctuation in the original recipe makes it somewhat difficult to determine which steps should be separated out to occur at different stages. I’ve translated the instructions as written to the best of my ability, but it may be worth noting that in my own experience, the process for making a jelly roll is usually slightly different: the cake is turned out out onto a tea towel while still warm, rolled into a log with the tea towel, allowed to cool, unrolled, spread with jam, and then re-rolled. I suspect that spreading the jam or marmalade onto the cake prior to rolling it the first time would cause it to melt into the cake, rather than remain a distinct filling.

Calling all translators! El Libro de Todos Los Moles

October 23, 2014

by E. S. Dempsey


I am working on translating El Libro de Todos los Moles by Paco Ignacio Taibo I, and am seeking fellow translators to provide feedback and advice.

The first half of El Libro de Todos los Moles  is a culinary history of the Mexican dish mole. The second part is a collection of mole recipes. Lots and lots of mole recipes.

The thing is, I have never cooked Mexican other than making tortillas from masa. It is mysterious and difficult for me to translate these directions, exotic spices and methods of cooking into English.

I have created a wordpress blog about my translation project at MoleLibro.wordpress.com, and a Google+ page for discussing Spanish words and phrases that I am unsure about how to translate:

If anyone is interested in offering comments and discussing my translation, I would be grateful.

 

Salsas de Sr. H. Winder (1904)

October 20, 2014
tags:
Recetas de Cocina por Mi Profesor Sr. H. Winder (1904) by Paulina Morante. TX716 .M4 M66 1904. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Recetas de Cocina por Mi Profesor Sr. H. Winder (1904) by Paulina Morante. TX716 .M4 M66 1904. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Morante, Paulina. Recetas de Cocina por Mi Profesor Sr. H. Winder. Méjico, Noviembre 1904. TX716 .M4 M66 1904. Mexican Cookbook Collection. UTSA Libraries Special Collections. [Digital Surrogate]


During September and October, La Cocina Histórica will feature recipes from recently digitized manuscript cookbooks. 


Cooking classes were a popular past time among Mexico’s middle and upper class women in the early to mid 20th century. Cookbook authors such as Alejandro Pardo and Josefina Velázquez de León earned significant portions of their living as culinary instructors, which provided opportunities to directly influence the culinary (and cookbook-reading) habits of the Mexican elite.

The title of today’s manuscript cookbook, which translates roughly as Recipes of Professor Mrs. H. Winder, seems likely to be the result of creator Paulina Morante’s enrollment in a cooking class of this kind. The recipes are inscribed in a beautiful, unhurried hand (albeit with little or no punctuation) and the title of each dish is clearly marked in larger writing with flourishes. Beginning with soups, the recipe book then moves on to eggs, sauces, an extensive section on fish, poultry and waterfowl, beef and pork, and finally a variety of recipes that don’t seem to fit into a single unified category. This final section includes dishes such as beignets á la Lorraine (Lorraine-style fritters), gelatina (gelatin), alcachofas á la Italiana (Italian artichokes), and Langosta á la Americana (American-style lobster).

Recetas de Cocina por Mi Profesor Sr. H. Winder (1904) by Paulina Morante. TX716 .M4 M66 1904. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Recetas de Cocina por Mi Profesor Sr. H. Winder (1904) by Paulina Morante. TX716 .M4 M66 1904. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Following the index for pages 1-57 are several pages of recipes of quite different appearance than the preceding ones. The handwriting appears much more hurried or informal, and although each recipe is still titled, the titles are written in the same style and size of writing as the recipes themselves. Also, unlike in the earlier pages, recipes frequently run together, with no empty lines between them. The recipes in this section primarily consist of chicken and beef dishes, although there is also a recipe for hollandaise sauce, an egg dish, and tamales muy finas. Presumably, Paulina Morante (or a later owner) used the blank pages at the end of her course notes to record other recipes that she wished to remember and keep track of.

The salsas included in the second section of this recipe book are meant to be applicable to a wide variety of dishes. The recipes below explain how to make mayonnaise, tomato sauce, and madeira sauce.


Salsa Mayoneza (00013)

Yemas de huevo
Mostaza Francesa
Mucho aceite
Poco vinagre
Sal pimienta

Se incorpora el huevo con la mostaza despues el aceite pero muy poco á poco casi de gota en gota y sin dejar de de moler la salsa con otra [?] se agrega sal pimienta y al última el vinagre al gusto.

Si á esta salsa se le agrega. [Estrayon], [Perifollo], y pepinos infurtidos y picados se le llama salsa – Tartara

La misma agregandole Challotes se llama – Ravigot

Se pone en una caserola un trozo de mantequilla, seboya, zanahoria, perejil y jamón picado esto se pone á freir cuando lo este se le agrega harina unos jitomates bien desbaratados y un poco de caldo, se pone otra vez á la lumbre con otro trocito de mantequilla. Esta salsa sirve para el pescado para los asados etc. etc. 

 

Mayonnaise (00013)

Egg yolks
French mustard
Lots of oil
A little vinegar
salt and pepper

Mix the eggs with mustard and then the oil, but a little at a time, almost drop by drop, and without ceasing to mix the sauce as you add it. Add the salt and pepper, and at the very end, vinegar to taste.

If the following ingredients are added: tarragon, chervil, and pickled cucumbers (chopped), it is called salsa Tartara.

If the same sauce has shallots added, it is called Ravigote.


Salsa de Jitomate (00014)

Se pone en una caserola un trozo de mantequilla, seboya, zanahoria, perejil y jamón picado esto se pone á freir cuando lo este se le agrega harina unos jitomates bien desbaratados y un poco de caldo, se pone otra vez á la lumbre con otro trocito de mantequilla. Esta salsa sirve para el pescado para los asados etc. etc. 

 

Tomato Sauce (00014)

In a pot, combine a bit of butter, onion, carrots, parsley and ham (all chopped up). As this cooks, add flour, tomatoes (well-mashed) and a little broth. Return to the heat with a bit more butter. This sauce may be served with fish, roasts, etc. etc.


Salsa Madeira (00016)

Se dora en mantequilla un poco de harina á que quede color de chocolate se le agrega jugo de carne o calda yervas de olor sebolla zanahoria y el vino de Madeira que antes habra hervido en un caserola. 

Madeira Sauce (00016)

Brown a little flour in some butter till it turns the color of chocolate. Then, add beef stock or a broth of fragrant herbs, onion, and carrots. Also add Madeira wine (previously brought to boil in another pot).


[1]

High Tea in Mexico

October 13, 2014
Cuaderno de Recetas de Cocina (1902) by Hortensia Volante. TX716 .M4 V65 1902. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Cuaderno de Recetas de Cocina (1902) by Hortensia Volante. TX716 .M4 V65 1902. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Volante, Hortensia. Cuaderno de Recetas de Cocina. 1902. TX716 .M4 V65 1902.  Mexican Cookbook Collection. UTSA Libraries Special Collections. [Digital Surrogate]


During September and October, La Cocina Histórica will feature recipes from recently digitized manuscript cookbooks. 


Last week’s post featured menus from Resetas de Cocina: Refrescos, Reposteria, Dulces, one of eleven school notebooks belonging to Hortensia Volante, ranging in date from 1900-1928. This week, we take a look at one of Hortensia’s notebooks from 1902.

Although Cuaderno de Recetas de Cocina contains a wide variety of savory and sweet recipes, one of the most interesting entries is the one for Te (tea). Sandwiched between Dulce de Peras (pear candy) and Natillas (custard), Hortensia recorded instructions not for how to make tea, but for what to serve at Tea, a social meal or event derived from the English tradition.

Te [00040]

Un te resuelta muy bien servido con los siguientes elementos: te, leche, sandwichs,  panecillos de foie gras, petits gateaux de soirée, panecitos, plum puding, un baba, una brioche grande, galletas saladas y de otras sortes, lenguas de gato, pastas para te y dulces. Vinos Jerez y o porto.

Tea [00040]

A tea goes well if the following are served: tea, milk, sandwiches, rolls with foie gras, Petits fours, bread rolls, plum pudding, baba [1], a large brioche [2],  soda crackers and other kinds, cat tongue cookies [3], [pastas] for tea [4], sweet wine, sherry, or port.


[1] Baba is a French dessert, often referring to rum baba, which is a yeast-based pastry saturated with rum and filled with cream.

[2] Brioche is a rich egg bread of French origin.

[3] See past posts for cat tongue cookie recipes. No felines were harmed in the making of these.

[4] Hortensia uses both French and Spanish in her notebooks. If French, pasta would translate as Italian pasta noodles; if Spanish, it would translate as something like pastry dough. In this context, I could imagine it referring either to the kinds of cold pasta salads one might serve at a luncheon or a variety of small pastries suitable for the same.

Food History

Food Through the Ages

The Culinary Curator

Being a Journal of Narratives and Discoveries

Feast of the Centuries

Cooking throughout the Ages

Gherkins & Tomatoes

Meditations on the World of Food

What's Cookin' @ Special Collections?!

Special Collections @ Virginia Tech Culinary History Blog!

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