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Bolitas de Leche (Milk Balls), 1937.

September 29, 2014
Cuaderno de Recetas de Teresa Vélez O. Toluca, Mexico: 1937. TX716 .M4 V461 1937. UTSA Libraries Special Collections

Cuaderno de Recetas de Teresa Vélez O. Toluca, Mexico: 1937. TX716 .M4 V461 1937. UTSA Libraries Special Collections

Vélez Orozco, Teresa. LCuaderno de Recetas de Teresa Vélez O. Toluca, Mexico: 1937. TX716 .M4 V461 1937. Mexican Cookbook Collection. UTSA Libraries Special Collections. [Digital Surrogate]


During September and October, La Cocina Histórica will feature recipes from recently digitized manuscript cookbooks. 


Manuscript cookbooks often include recipes documenting the social networks of their writers as friends, neighbors, and family share their recipes for everyday meals and special treats. In the case of this notebook from 1937, a note on one of the first pages indicates that the recipes were “dictadas y esperimentadas por la Sra María Vde de Chaix. However, it is not clear whether María is a personal friend of the writer or perhaps the instructor for a cooking course.

The bulk of this cookbook consists of traditional desserts, such as Budín de requesón, Brios, Panques, Cubiletes, Pasta de Durazno, Buñuelos, Turron de yemas, and Dulce de Piñon. Below is a recipe for Bolitas de Leche (Milk Balls). Most of the more recent recipes that I found for comparison use either powdered milk or sweetened condensed milk. I suspect the main benefit of either is to lessen the amount of time needed for the milk to reduce to an extent that allows one to shape it into balls.


Bolitas de Leche (00071)

Piloncillo………………..1/2 K. de prieto
Agua………………………1/2 litro
Leche……………………..1/2 litro
Anis……………………….una muñequita
Canela……………………un trocito
Cascara de naranja….un pedacito

M. de He.

Se pone la herbia la leche el pilonsillo y el agua ya que esté disuelto el pilonsillo [a] sa[ea] se cuela se pone al fuego con la muñequita de anis, la canela, y la cascara de naranja ya que esté de punto espeso y que se pueda hacer bolita con los de] dos se [vacea] luego [buelo] [de] alguna cosa que esté [engor] usada. 

Milk Balls (00071)

Mexican Brown Sugar Cones…… 1/2 kilogram dark
Water……………………………………..1/2 liter
Milk………………………………………..1/2 liter
Anise………………………………………a little piece (literally little doll)
Cinnamon……………………………….a small cinnamon stick
orange peel……………………………..a little piece

To Prepare:

Bring the milk to a boil. Dissolve the sugar in the water. Add the sugar water, anise, cinnamon, and orange peel to the milk. Continue to cook until the milk mixture becomes very thick and you can form balls from it.[1]


[1] The syntax of this recipe is complicated. I have done my best to draw out the order in which steps should occur. However, I am not entirely certain whether the milk should be brought to a boil and then have the water and sugar added (as written above), or whether all three ingredients should be brought to a boil simultaneously, with the sugar dissolving as the mixture heats.

Early Modern Recipes Online Collective (EMROC) and The Recipes Project

September 22, 2014

EMROC HomepageReading and transcribing recipes from UTSA’s manuscript cookbooks over the past several weeks led me to stumble upon two related websites that I suspect readers of La Cocina Histórica’s would also enjoy. First, The Early Modern recipes Online Collective (EMROC) describes projects involving transcription of manuscript recipe books written by four 17th century English women. The Recipes Project is an independent, but related blog featuring posts about historical recipes (for food, medicine, and more), transcription, teaching with recipes, and culinary collections. Three posts I particularly enjoyed include:

 Transcribing in Baby Steps by Jennifer Munroe

Pen, Ink, and Pedagogy by Amanda E. Herbert

Old-Fashioned Recipes, New-Fashioned Kitchens: Technology and Women’s Recipe Collecting in the Nineteenth Century by Rachel A. Snell

 

 

Pastel Pardo / Pardo’s Cake. 1920s.

September 15, 2014

de los Angeles Dávalos, María. Libreta de Cocina Manuscript Cookbook. San Luis Potosí: 1921-1951. TX716 .M4 D383 1921. Mexican Cookbook Collection. UTSA Libraries Special Collections. [Digital Surrogate]

ibreta de Cocina Manuscript Cookbook by María de los Angeles Dávalos. San Luis Potosí: 1921-1951. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

ibreta de Cocina Manuscript Cookbook by María de los Angeles Dávalos. San Luis Potosí: 1921-1951. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.


During September and October, La Cocina Histórica will feature recipes from recently digitized manuscript cookbooks. 


María de los Angeles Dávalos (and/or subsequent writers) inscribed three decades worth of recipes in Libreta de Cocina. Its contents are heavily weighted towards baking and dessert-preparation, but main course dishes such as Beef Tongue in Tuna fruit salsa make an occasional appearance.

The recipe below for Pastel Pardo is one of many cake recipes in Libreta de Cocina. This one, however, particularly caught my eye because “Pardo” was the name of an influential Mexico City chef who established one of the first cooking academies in Mexico City and also published several cookbooks in the early 20th century. While I could not find a cake just like this one in the three cookbooks by Alejandro Pardo in UTSA’s collection, it is possible that this might be a derivation of one of his recipes, or perhaps one that was included in his cooking classes. Then again, it might simply be a cake recipe provided to María de los Angeles Dávalos by a friend or neighbor named Pardo.


Libreta de Cocina will be on display in the John Peace Library Reading Room from August to December 2014.


Pastel Pardo (00013-00014)

Chocolate vainilla 250 gms, azucar 100 gms, harina 100 gms, mantequilla 280 gms, almendras picada y tostada 50 gms, Naranja cubierta picada 1 mitad, huevos 8, claras 6. Decorad[o] Merengue Italiano 5 claras, chochitos platiados 20 gms fondan 1/9 kilo, azucar. 

Modo de hacer el pastel

Se pone la mantequilla y el azucar y se vate hasta que esponje, y luego se van poniendo las yemas de una en una hasta que pongan las 8 yemas, luego se pone el chocolate rayado y la almendra picada y la naranja, aparte se baten 6 claras a punto de merengue y se rebuelve todo punto merengue con la mantequilla despues del chocolate se le pone la harina se echa en molde de corona engrasado y es polvoriado de harina y se meté a horno regular 40 [mins?] luego se vaña con el fondán, del merengue se aparta 1/4 parte y se le ponen 50 gramos de almendras tostados y picadas y el jugo de un límon se rellena con el merengue velga (este es el nombre del merengue) y se le hacen unos puntos de dos al [rastedor?] y en la superficie formando capete tambien de punto de dos y en todos los puntitos unos chochitos platiados. 

Pardo Cake (00013-00014)

  • 250 grams vanilla chocolate [1]
  • 100 grams sugar
  • 100 grams flour
  • 280 grams butter
  • 50 grams chopped, toasted almonds
  • 1/2 orange peel, candied and chopped.
  • 8 egg yolks [2]
  • 6 egg whites
  • Italian Meringue: 5 egg whites, silver dragees [3], 1/9 kilogram fondant, sugar

Preparation

Beat the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy. Add the egg yolks one by one until you have added all eight of them. Then add the chocolate (grated), the chopped almonds, and the orange.

Separately, beat the 6 egg whites until they form peaks and then mix into the butter mixture after the chocolate. Then, add the flour and pour into a greased-and-floured ring pan. Bake in a moderate oven [4] for 40 minutes.

Later, cover the cake with the fondant. Separately, mid up the Italian Meringue. To 1/4th of the meringue, add 50 grams of toasted, chopped almonds and the juice of one lemon. Fill the middle of the ring with this mixture. Cover the cake and filing with the rest of the meringue and decorate with silver dragees.[5]


[1] Mexican chocolate is often sold with flavorings such as vanilla or pecan already added.

[2] Although the Spanish ingredients list 8 huevos and 6 claras, reading the instructions makes it clear in this case, the writer is using huevos/eggs to refer to yolks and claras/whites to specify egg whites.

[3] I was unable to identify a direct translation for chochitos platiados; however, I believe the writer is referring to the decorative, edible silver balls often used in cake decorating.

[4] A moderate oven is around 350-375*F.

[5] The final paragraph of this recipe twice includes the phrase “punto de dos.” As best as I can determine, I believe it is referring to covering both the cake itself and the meringue used as filling in the center of the ring of cake, with an outer cap of unflavored meringue, but I am not entirely certain of this.

Sopa de Cebolla con Crema (Creamy Onion Soup) and Puerco Frito a lo Habanero (Havana Pork). Circa 1911.

September 8, 2014
Libreta de Recetas de Cocina. Manuscript cookbook written by Aurora Vélez Orozco G., circa 1911. TX716 .M4 V462 1911. Mexican Cookbook Collection. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Libreta de Recetas de Cocina. Manuscript cookbook written by Aurora Vélez Orozco G., circa 1911. TX716 .M4 V462 1911. Mexican Cookbook Collection. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Vélez Orozco G., Aurora. Libreta de Recetas de Cocina [Manuscript Cookbook]. Toluca, Mexico State: circa 1911. TX716 .M4 V462 1911. Mexican Cookbook Collection. UTSA Libraries Special Collections. [Digital Surrogate]


During September and October, La Cocina Histórica will feature recipes from recently digitized manuscript cookbooks. 


Libra de Recetas de Cocina is one of a series of nine manuscript cookbooks from a family in Toluca, the capitol of Mexico state. It is a small volume containing just twenty-four recipes on thirteen pages. Unlike last week’s featured dessert book, its focus is on savory dishes like onion soup, creamed spinach, and pork loin. However, it does include a few recipes for sweets such as Italian nougat at the end. Notice that the handwriting is markedly more difficult to read than that in the 1884 cookbook.


Libreta de Recetas de Cocina will be on display in the John Peace Library Reading Room from August to December 2014.


Sopa de Cebolla con Crema (00003)

Cantidades

  • 2 cebolas [cabesonas?] y grandes
  • 2 gitomates grandes
  • 0.02 c. de crema
  • caldo de pollo o de res
  • pedasas de pan frito o galletas soda

Se ponen a freir en manteca los gitomates. Asadas y molidas con ajo y cebolla alli [a?] cuela la cebolla con el caldo el que sea nesesario. Se deja [apre?] hierva a que sazone y en seguida se le desuelve la crema. [Lla] para serbirse se le ponen las galletas. 

Creamy Onion Soup (00003)

Quantities

  • 2 large onions
  • 2 large red tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup Mexican sour cream
  • chicken or beef broth
  • croutons or soda crackers

Fry the tomatoes in lard. Roast and grind them with garlic and onion. Cook the onion mixture in the broth. Strain the chunks out when cooked. Simmer the remaining soup to enhance the flavor, and then add the sour cream. Serve with crackers.

[1] “Cuela” seems to unambiguously mean “strain,” but I can’t figure out how one would strain onions with broth (as the syntax would seem to indicate). Instead, I am assuming that the onion mixture is being cooked in the broth and then the chunks are strained out.


Puerco Frito a lo Habanero (00007-00008)

Prepárece en un Platón un adobo de vinagre, oregano, sal y un poco de Pimienta molida y unos ajos machacados, échece en este caldo la carne de Puerco partida en pedazos, cuando se c[irc]osea que a toneado bien el gusto alli adobo, se raja la carne y se pone a freir en manteca. Sirvase con platanos verdes o pintos fritos y con arroz blanco.

Havana Pork (00007-00008)

Prepare a marinade of vinegar, oregano, salt, black pepper, and garlic. Add pieces of pork. When well-marinated, tear the meat intro strips and fry it in lard. Serve with plantains or fried beans and white rice.[1]

[1] If you read this recipe previously, you saw my speculation about the absence from the recipe itself of the habanero chiles that seemed implied by its name. However, a reader has since pointed out to me that Habanero also (and perhaps even more commonly) refers to the capital of Cuba, a native of that capital, and/or a particular style of music and dance, among other things. With that in mind, I believe that the title of this recipe correctly translates as Havana Pork, and no chiles are implied.  

Mostachones (Macaroons) and Punche de Leche (Milk Punch). 1884.

September 1, 2014
Libro de Recetas de Cocina. 1884 manuscript cookbook written by Guadalupe Perez. TX 716 .M4 P4759 1884. Mexican Cookbook Collection. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Libro de Recetas de Cocina. 1884 manuscript cookbook written by Guadalupe Perez. TX 716 .M4 P4759 1884. Mexican Cookbook Collection. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Perez, Guadalupe. Libro de Recetas de Cocina [Manuscript Cookbooks]. Acatzinco, Puebla: 1884. TX716 .M4 P4759 1884. Mexican Cookbook Collection. UTSA Libraries Special Collections. [Digital Surrogate]


During September and October, La Cocina Histórica will feature recipes from recently digitized manuscript cookbooks. 


Libra de Recetas de Cocina originated in Acatzingo (or as the author Guadalupe Perez writes it, Acatzinco), a town in Puebla famous for its desserts. Appropriately enough, this notebook contains a multitude of recipes for cakes, candy, ices, and other sweet things. Two recipes that particularly caught my eye were Mostachones (macaroons) and Punche de Leche (Milk Punch), reproduced below.

Like many writers of manuscript cookbooks, Guadalupe Perez frequently used non-standard spellings. For example, in the macaroon recipe below, she writes “sinco” for “cinco” (five), “arina” for “harina”(flour), and “orno” for “horno”(oven). Variant spellings like these, along with the common use of abbreviated instructions, the difficulty of reading handwriting, and occasional tears or scratched-out text, add an extra level of difficulty to the challenge of transcribing and interpreting historical recipes.


Libra de Recetas de Cocina will be on display in the John Peace Library Reading Room from August to December 2014.


Mostachones (00014)

En un cazo sinco yemas y sinco huevos enteros se baten con una cuchara y asi que espese se le echa una libra de azucar y treinta claras de huevos [se?] le echa una libra y cuatro onzas de arina se baten biene [p?]ara que se incorpore y se deja reposar dos ó tres horas [h?]asen bolitas humedes in dos las manos se [enbuel] [?]n en papeles y se meten al orno templadoe.

Macaroons (00014)

Beat 5 egg yolks with 5 whole eggs until fluffy. Separately, beat 30 egg whites with 1 pound sugar.[1] Fold the egg white mixture into the egg yolk mixture. Add 1 1/4 pounds flour and mix well. Allow to rest for 2-3 hours. Form moist balls with both hands. Place on paper [2] and bake in a moderate oven (~325-350*F)

[1] It isn’t entirely clear in the original syntax whether the 30 egg whites should be added to the already-beaten egg mixture at the same time as the sugar, or if the egg whites and sugar should first be beaten together on their own. I suspect that the latter would produce airier, more macaroon-like results. 

[2] I assume that papeles in this context probably refers to parchment paper for baking. 


Punche de leche (00036)

Se ponen siete cuartillos de leche y se deja que de un [-----] luego se endulsa al gusto y se le echa media libra de almendra no muy remolida se le echa unas rajas de canela un muñequeta de vainilla y un poquito de limon se pone á la lumbre á que de un hervor fuerte se aparta y se echa en una oya limpia. 

Milk Punch (00036)

Allow seven quarts of milk to [---] [1]. Sweeten to taste and add half a pound of almonds (not ground too finely). Also, add some cinnamon sticks, a vanilla bean, and a little lemon. Place on the fire and bring to a full boil. Remove and pour into a clean pan.

[1] I was unable to decipher a key word in this sentence. It looks like “elbov” or “ilbor.” Check the original document to see if you can determine what it might be.  Brainstorming things that milk could be “left” to do, I could only think of milk being left to sour or (if unpasteurized) to separate. Neither seems particularly likely in the context of this recipe.

Special Collections Student Clerk Position at Main Campus

August 28, 2014

UTSA Libraries Special Collections is seeking one student clerk to assist with department operations at Main Campus. Interested students may apply by submitting a resume and cover letter to specialcollections@utsa.edu.


Job Title: Student Clerk

Job Description: With training from the Rare Books Librarian other department staff, carry out basic tasks in the Special Collections department. Activities may include paging, photocopying, and re-shelving materials; scanning and entering basic metadata for digital collections; cleaning, processing, and re-housing incoming materials; assisting with exhibit preparations; and other duties as determined.

Qualifications: Strong attention to detail and willingness to perform repetitive tasks. Some lifting required. Willingness and ability to work in conditions with occasional exposure to dust and mold needed. Familiarity with scanners and image editing software a plus.

Work Schedule: Flexible during office hours, Mon-Fri.

 Hours per Week: 15

Wage: $7.50/hr

How to Apply: Submit resume and cover letter to specialcollections@utsa.edu. If you have questions regarding the position, please contact Special Collections at specialcollections@utsa.edu.

Newly Digitized Manuscript Cookbooks

August 25, 2014
Resetas de Cocina: Refrescos, Reposteria, Dulces. 1910 manuscript cookbook written by Cármen Volante. TX716 .M4 V653 1910. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Resetas de Cocina: Refrescos, Reposteria, Dulces. 1910 manuscript cookbook written by Cármen Volante. TX716 .M4 V653 1910. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

This summer, UTSA Libraries Special Collections digitized 24 additional manuscript cookbooks from the Mexican Cookbook Collection. Dating from 1789 to the 1960s these handwritten recipe books provide a window into the lives and kitchens of Mexican women over the course of almost two hundred years.

Complete digital surrogates of these cookbooks (as well as those previously digitized) are available in our Digital Collections. Over the next several weeks, selected recipes will be featured here on La Cocina Histórica.

To sneak a peek at the original documents, stop by the JPL Reading Room, where six of these treasures will be on display during the Fall Semester.

Food History

Food Through the Ages

The Culinary Curator

Being a Journal of Narratives and Discoveries

Feast of the Centuries

Cooking throughout the Ages

Gherkins & Tomatoes

The Joy of Cookbooks

What's Cookin' @ Special Collections?!

Special Collections @ Virginia Tech Culinary History Blog!

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