Skip to content

Salsas de Sr. H. Winder (1904)

October 20, 2014
tags:
Recetas de Cocina por Mi Profesor Sr. H. Winder (1904) by Paulina Morante. TX716 .M4 M66 1904. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Recetas de Cocina por Mi Profesor Sr. H. Winder (1904) by Paulina Morante. TX716 .M4 M66 1904. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Morante, Paulina. Recetas de Cocina por Mi Profesor Sr. H. Winder. Méjico, Noviembre 1904. TX716 .M4 M66 1904. Mexican Cookbook Collection. UTSA Libraries Special Collections. [Digital Surrogate]


During September and October, La Cocina Histórica will feature recipes from recently digitized manuscript cookbooks. 


Cooking classes were a popular past time among Mexico’s middle and upper class women in the early to mid 20th century. Cookbook authors such as Alejandro Pardo and Josefina Velázquez de León earned significant portions of their living as culinary instructors, which provided opportunities to directly influence the culinary (and cookbook-reading) habits of the Mexican elite.

The title of today’s manuscript cookbook, which translates roughly as Recipes of Professor Mrs. H. Winder, seems likely to be the result of creator Paulina Morante’s enrollment in a cooking class of this kind. The recipes are inscribed in a beautiful, unhurried hand (albeit with little or no punctuation) and the title of each dish is clearly marked in larger writing with flourishes. Beginning with soups, the recipe book then moves on to eggs, sauces, an extensive section on fish, poultry and waterfowl, beef and pork, and finally a variety of recipes that don’t seem to fit into a single unified category. This final section includes dishes such as beignets á la Lorraine (Lorraine-style fritters), gelatina (gelatin), alcachofas á la Italiana (Italian artichokes), and Langosta á la Americana (American-style lobster).

Recetas de Cocina por Mi Profesor Sr. H. Winder (1904) by Paulina Morante. TX716 .M4 M66 1904. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Recetas de Cocina por Mi Profesor Sr. H. Winder (1904) by Paulina Morante. TX716 .M4 M66 1904. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Following the index for pages 1-57 are several pages of recipes of quite different appearance than the preceding ones. The handwriting appears much more hurried or informal, and although each recipe is still titled, the titles are written in the same style and size of writing as the recipes themselves. Also, unlike in the earlier pages, recipes frequently run together, with no empty lines between them. The recipes in this section primarily consist of chicken and beef dishes, although there is also a recipe for hollandaise sauce, an egg dish, and tamales muy finas. Presumably, Paulina Morante (or a later owner) used the blank pages at the end of her course notes to record other recipes that she wished to remember and keep track of.

The salsas included in the second section of this recipe book are meant to be applicable to a wide variety of dishes. The recipes below explain how to make mayonnaise, tomato sauce, and madeira sauce.


Salsa Mayoneza (00013)

Yemas de huevo
Mostaza Francesa
Mucho aceite
Poco vinagre
Sal pimienta

Se incorpora el huevo con la mostaza despues el aceite pero muy poco á poco casi de gota en gota y sin dejar de de moler la salsa con otra [?] se agrega sal pimienta y al última el vinagre al gusto.

Si á esta salsa se le agrega. [Estrayon], [Perifollo], y pepinos infurtidos y picados se le llama salsa – Tartara

La misma agregandole Challotes se llama – Ravigot

Se pone en una caserola un trozo de mantequilla, seboya, zanahoria, perejil y jamón picado esto se pone á freir cuando lo este se le agrega harina unos jitomates bien desbaratados y un poco de caldo, se pone otra vez á la lumbre con otro trocito de mantequilla. Esta salsa sirve para el pescado para los asados etc. etc. 

 

Mayonnaise (00013)

Egg yolks
French mustard
Lots of oil
A little vinegar
salt and pepper

Mix the eggs with mustard and then the oil, but a little at a time, almost drop by drop, and without ceasing to mix the sauce as you add it. Add the salt and pepper, and at the very end, vinegar to taste.

If the following ingredients are added: tarragon, chervil, and pickled cucumbers (chopped), it is called salsa Tartara.

If the same sauce has shallots added, it is called Ravigote.


Salsa de Jitomate (00014)

Se pone en una caserola un trozo de mantequilla, seboya, zanahoria, perejil y jamón picado esto se pone á freir cuando lo este se le agrega harina unos jitomates bien desbaratados y un poco de caldo, se pone otra vez á la lumbre con otro trocito de mantequilla. Esta salsa sirve para el pescado para los asados etc. etc. 

 

Tomato Sauce (00014)

In a pot, combine a bit of butter, onion, carrots, parsley and ham (all chopped up). As this cooks, add flour, tomatoes (well-mashed) and a little broth. Return to the heat with a bit more butter. This sauce may be served with fish, roasts, etc. etc.


Salsa Madeira (00016)

Se dora en mantequilla un poco de harina á que quede color de chocolate se le agrega jugo de carne o calda yervas de olor sebolla zanahoria y el vino de Madeira que antes habra hervido en un caserola. 

Madeira Sauce (00016)

Brown a little flour in some butter till it turns the color of chocolate. Then, add beef stock or a broth of fragrant herbs, onion, and carrots. Also add Madeira wine (previously brought to boil in another pot).


[1]

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

The Culinary Curator

Being a Journal of Narratives and Discoveries

Feast of the Centuries

Cooking throughout the Ages

Cynthia D. Bertelsen's Gherkins & Tomatoes

A Writer's Musings on History and Culture

What's Cookin' @ Special Collections?!

Special Collections @ Virginia Tech Culinary History Blog!

%d bloggers like this: